Liberian mystery disease may be solved

first_img “Turn-around time for transportation and results have dropped drastically,” says Thomas Nagbe, director of the epidemiology and infectious diseases division at the National Public Health Institute of Liberia. The alert reached Monrovia in a matter of hours. That same day, an investigative team, which included scientists from CDC stationed in Monrovia, drove to Greenville, an 8-hour car ride in the current rainy conditions. At the same time a motorcycle courier carrying patient samples set out from the hospital, arriving in Monrovia at about 7 p.m. that evening, Gasasira says. Later that night the National Reference Laboratory ruled out Ebola, to widespread relief. Tests also ruled out Lassa fever, and the main hypothesis became poisoning, because all the patients had attended the same funeral on 22 April, except for a woman who died in Monrovia. Her husband, who also died, did attend, and investigators speculated that he may have brought home food or taken food from his home to the funeral. Those investigations continue. CDC is also testing urine, blood, and serum samples for metals and some environmental poisons, according to a spokesperson. “We are not ruling out anything yet,” Gasasira says. But the evidence for meningitis is mounting. A Kenyan pathologist who did autopsies this weekend on two of the bodies noted signs consistent with meningitis, Nagbe says. Although few patients had fever, a common sign of meningitis, other symptoms and the short time between onset of disease and death are typical. “The clinical presentation was very unusual, that is why meningitis was not at the top of our list,” Gasasira says. Samples from the other patients will be tested for N. meningitidis as well, Gasasira says. “Then we’ll be much more confident.”A big question is why N. meningitidis should suddenly appear in Liberia. Since a new vaccine was introduced in 2010, the number of meningitis cases in Africa has dropped dramatically. But that vaccine protects only against serotype A. The number of infections with serotype C has gone up; Nigeria and Niger are now battling a large outbreak. “Meningitis C is filling the vacuum created where meningitis A was a problem,” Gasasira says. “But we never had Type A.” Another possibility is that the disease was present in Liberia but just wasn’t picked up in the past. Some of the precautionary measures that have already been taken could help limit any further spread. For instance, patients were given prophylactic antibiotics, and lists of people who had contact with cases were quickly drawn up. The response suggests that Liberia’s capacity for detecting a disease outbreak has greatly improved in the wake of Ebola, says Vincent Munster, a virologist at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases’ Rocky Mountain Laboratories in Hamilton, Montana. But West Africa, with all the international resources poured into it, is a special case, he adds. “There are number of countries that are nowhere near that situation.” Liberian mystery disease may be solved When several people died suddenly late last month in Liberia after attending a funeral in the southern county of Sinoe, alarm bells sounded: Had Ebola returned to West Africa? In 2014 and 2015, the largest known outbreak of the deadly disease killed more than 11,000 people in Liberia and two neighboring countries. But instead of signaling the return of that virus, the outbreak—which so far has sickened 30 people and killed 13—may have highlighted its legacy: a disease-monitoring system put in place after Ebola. Although the public health response was far from flawless, it rapidly stilled Ebola fears and now points to a different disease: meningitis.On Monday, just 13 days after the first cases were reported, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta announced that samples from four patients tested positive for Neisseria meningitidis serotype C, a bacterium that infects the membranes surrounding the brain and, if untreated, can kill up to half the people it sickens. The disease spreads through close contact such as kissing and often causes devastating epidemics across what is known as the meningitis belt stretching across Africa. But it is unfamiliar in Liberia. The first patient, an 11-year-old girl, arrived at the F. J. Grant Memorial Hospital in Greenville, a regional capital, on 23 April, suffering from vomiting and diarrhea but also mental confusion and hallucinations. Within an hour she was dead. Another patient with similar symptoms came the next day. Then, on the morning of 25 April, 14 patients arrived. At that point, the “integrated disease surveillance and response,” a framework established post-Ebola, kicked in. At least one health worker in every district has been trained to monitor and report any suspicious events, says Alex Gasasira, the World Health Organization representative in Monrovia. They then inform county officials, who pass the information up to the national level.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) A new disease outbreak stirred memories of Liberia’s Ebola epidemic in 2014 and 2015, when health workers wore protective garb, but studies suggest it’s bacterial meningitis.center_img DOMINIQUE FAGET/Staff/Getty Images By Kai KupferschmidtMay. 8, 2017 , 5:45 PMlast_img read more

Turkish ice dancers wary of wardrobe malfunction at 2018 Winter Olympics

first_imgA pair of Turkish ice dancers on Tuesday said they take care to ensure their relatively conservative costumes are firmly in place when they compete but maintained it was not due to any pressure from their government.Skating a day after French ice dancer Gabriella Papadakis suffered a wardrobe malfunction in her Olympic short dance program that left her briefly exposed, the Turkish team said avoiding a similar fate is their priority.”The most important part for Alisa when she designs it is keeping it safe,” Alper Ucar told Reuters following his free dance routine with partner Alisa Agafonova at the Gangneung Ice Arena on Tuesday.Ukrainian-born Agafonova, who represented the Eastern European nation until 2010, said: “I am doing what I like and what you see is what I decided that I like.”Wearing costumes that evoked ancient Egypt, they are among the most covered-up of any of the performers but the duo said it was their own choice.Ucar said the Turkish Olympic committee did not give them any specific directions on their costumes.”Turkey is a country where one side is Europe and the other side is the Middle East,” he said.”We are a multicultural country and our traditional designs for our costumes are generally very liked by the crowd. We are a democratic country, so there is no pressure. They are always supporting us and that’s why we are here.”WARDROBE MALFUNCTION CONTINUES TO HAUNT FIGURE SKATERS The clasp holding Gabriella’s green-and-gold sequined dress together came undone at the start of the routine (Reuters Photo)Gabriella was the latest victim of wardrobe malfunction at the Pyeongchang Games on Monday as the French ice dancer’s costume at the start of her Olympic short dance programme threatened to bring the whole thing down.advertisementAs Papadakis and partner Guillaume Cizeron began their scorching Latin routine to Ed Sheeran music, the clasp holding her green-and-gold sequined dress together came undone.Gabriella later described the incident as her worst nightmare.”My worst nightmare happened at the Olympics, I felt it right away and I prayed, it was all I could do,” Papadakis told reporters.Though the two managed to complete their routine, it was obvious that Papadakis was struggling to keep her dress up, while Cizeron also did his best to ensure it did not slip further.”It was hard to stay concentrated after the wardrobe malfunction we suffered,” Cizeron tweeted, though they still managed to finish their programme less than two points behind leaders Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir of Canada.MIN YURA’S WARDROBE MALFUNCTION ON OLYMPIC DEBUT Min’s costume came unhooked in the first 20-30 seconds of her routine (Reuters Photo)The French skaters, however, were not alone.South Korean ice dancers Min Yura and Alexander Gamelin had a similar mishap 10 days ago when the top of Min’s costume came unhooked.”In the first 20-30 seconds, this hook came undone,” Min said after the short dance on Monday, pointing at the top of her flaming scarlet costume.”It was falling off. The only thing that was holding it up was keeping my arms above here,” she said, gesturing to her shoulders.”Alex was trying to hold it up as much as he could while we were doing our transitions and everything, but the crowd knew what was happening and they kept screaming and supporting us.”I was thinking of stopping the programme but the crowd was so amazing I just kept going.”(Source: Reuters)last_img read more

PM hails Indian shooters at ISSF Junior World Cup

first_imgNew Delhi, Apr 1 (PTI) Prime Minister Narendra Modi today hailed the Indian shooters who won medals at the recently concluded ISSF Junior World Cup in Sydney.In a series of tweets, he congratulated the entire team for its efforts.”In the recently held #ISSFJWC, our young shooters have brought home several laurels and made every Indian very proud. Congratulations to the Indian team that took part and achieved remarkable success in the tournament in Sydney,” he said.Mentioning the names of the individual shooters who performed well at the International Shooting Sport Federation Junior World Cup (ISSF JWC), the prime minister said their performance has brought smiles to the faces of 125 crore Indians.”The stupendous performance of our shooters will strengthen the #FitIndia movement and many more youngsters will feel motivated to play more and excel,” he said.India ended its campaign at the event with a total of 24 medals to grab the second place in the overall standings.PTI NAB ASG SRYlast_img read more

Jim Harbaugh Has A Message For Critics Of Michigan QB Shea Patterson

first_imgA closeup of Jim Harbaugh wearing a Michigan hat and jacket.PISCATAWAY, NJ – NOVEMBER 10: Head coach Jim Harbaugh of the Michigan Wolverines coaches against the Rutgers Scarlet Knights during the third quarter at HighPoint.com Stadium on November 10, 2018 in Piscataway, New Jersey. Michigan won 42-7. (Photo by Corey Perrine/Getty Images)Shea Patterson was supposed to be the quarterback who finally delivered a great offense at Michigan under Jim Harbaugh. The former top dual-threat recruit starred at Ole Miss before transferring into the Wolverines’ program. Patterson had massive expectations upon arriving in Ann Arbor.A season-plus in, though, and Patterson has disappointed. Michigan’s offense has not become the juggernaut many expected it to be under Patterson – not even close, really.Patterson has struggled through three games in 2019, looking poor in Michigan’s blowout loss at Wisconsin on Saturday.Michigan’s quarterback has received plenty of criticism along the way. “It’s almost like … and just hear me out … Jim Harbaugh is an average college coach and Shea Patterson isn’t a game-changer,” CBS Sports Barrett Sallee tweeted.Harbaugh addressed the critics of Patterson during his radio show on Monday night.“I think Shea’s good. I think Shea’s a really good player, because he is,” Harbaugh said. “We have to give him the protection, we have to give him the time that a quarterback needs, and that’s on all of us. That’s on the coaching staff, that’s on the offensive line, that’s on the receivers getting open, tight ends as well — just like I think our backs are good and they need space, they need holes, they need room to run.“So that would be my answer to those that don’t think Shea’s a good quarterback. He is.”Despite his struggles, Patterson will be the guy at quarterback for Michigan moving forward. Dylan McCaffrey reportedly suffered a concussion during Saturday’s loss.Michigan is set to host Rutgers on Saturday.last_img read more

West Indies sack Richard Pybus, name Floyd Reifer as interim coach ahead of World Cup

first_imgWest Indies sack Richard Pybus, name Floyd Reifer as interim coach ahead of World CupAs part of a ‘calculated strategic move’, Richard Pybus was sacked as West Indies coach two months ahead of the World Cup. Floyd Reifer had played six Tests, eight ODIs and one T20I for the West Indies.advertisement Reuters AntiguaApril 12, 2019UPDATED: April 12, 2019 10:56 IST File photo of former West Indies coach Richard Pybus (Reuters Photo)HIGHLIGHTSPybus contract ran beyond the World Cup in England and WalesPybus guided the team to a Test series win over England, while the ODI series against the top-ranked side ended 2-2Reifer played six Tests, eight ODIs and one T20I for West Indies between 1997 and 2009West Indies appointed Floyd Reifer as their new interim head coach on Thursday, replacing Richard Pybus as part of a series of administrative changes less than two months before the World Cup.Pybus’ contract ran beyond the World Cup in England and Wales, but new Cricket West Indies (CWI) president Ricky Skerritt said changes were necessary and a “calculated strategic move” to reignite the passion for cricket in the region.Barbados-born Reifer played six Tests, eight one-day internationals and one Twenty20 for West Indies between 1997 and 2009 before moving into coaching.”Up to the end of 2018 Floyd Reifer had been identified as the outstanding emerging local coach,” Skerritt told a news conference in Antigua.”He displayed this by leading the West Indies A team successfully, including victories against the England Lions, and ended the past year by coaching the Senior men’s team to a T20 series win in Bangladesh.”England’s Pybus replaced Australian Stuart Law in January. He guided the team to a Test series win over England, while the ODI series against the top-ranked side ended 2-2.Among other changes, Skerritt overhauled the selection panel, with Robert Haynes replacing Courtney Browne as interim head of selectors.”We have found it necessary to immediately adjust our selection policy to become more open, inclusive, and player-centric,” he said.”I am therefore pleased to confirm that we have terminated the old embedded selection policy which secretly, but actively, victimised some players and banished them from selection consideration.”As part of the old selection policy, availability for domestic tournaments was a requirement to be picked for West Indies squads, but Skerritt said selectors would be allowed to pick all players who make themselves available.advertisementContractual disputes between players and CWI have weakened the team for several years, but Thursday’s announcement could pave the way for players such as Keiron Pollard to return to the ODI fold for the first time since 2016.”Participating in a World Cup is a career defining experience for West Indian players and coaching staff,” Skerritt said.”We therefore believe it is strategically more beneficial for a West Indian coach with the proven skill sets to have this exposure at CWI’s expense – rather than a foreign coach.”Twice winners West Indies open their World Cup campaign against Pakistan in Nottingham on May 31.Also Read | RCB performance will not affect Virat Kohli: Sunil Gavaskar to India TodayAlso Read | He’s unbelievable: Andre Russell’s six-hitting prowess floors Kuldeep Yadav and Jacques KallisAlso See:For sports news, updates, live scores and cricket fixtures, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for Sports news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byAkshay Ramesh Tags :Follow west indiesFollow 2019 World CupFollow Richard PybusFollow Floyd Reiferlast_img read more

Shoaib Malik retires from ODI after Pakistan’s World Cup campaign ends

first_imgShoaib Malik retires from ODI after Pakistan’s World Cup campaign endsWorld Cup 2019: Shoaib Malik retired from ODIs after Pakistan’s World Cup campaign ended. Pakistan could not reach the semi-finals and Malik had a poor tournamentadvertisement Next India Today Web Desk LondonJuly 6, 2019UPDATED: July 6, 2019 00:42 IST Shoaib Malik did not have a World Cup outing this time. (Reuters Photo)HIGHLIGHTSShoaib Malik retired from one-day internationals after Pakistan’s World Cup campaign endedShoaib Malik played 287 ODIs for Pakistan and scored 7534 runs at an average of 34.55Malik did not have a World Cup outing this time, scoring only 8 runs with two ducks in three matchesShoaib Malik retired from one-day internationals after Pakistan’s World Cup campaign ended at Lord’s on Friday. Malik had retired from Test cricket in 2016.Shoaib Malik was dropped from the playing xi after repeated failures during the World Cup. He was replaced by Harris Sohail who played a few impactful innings.I have no regrets. But it’s just that I have been too flexible in my batting order. I have batted wherever the team wanted. I have been dropped many times, I missed a few years of international cricket and have been around for 20 years, Malik said. I am disappointed to be judged on two bad games here, Malik said.Today I retire from One Day International cricket. Huge Thank you to all the players I have played with, coaches I have trained under, family, friends, media, and sponsors. Most importantly my fans, I love you all#PakistanZindabad pic.twitter.com/zlYvhNk8n0Shoaib Malik (@realshoaibmalik) July 5, 2019Malik was in the middle of a controversy after photos of him having dinner with wife Sania Mirza went viral.Unfortunately for Malik, he had scored a duck in a heavy defeat to India. The photos went viral the day after but the dinner was before the high-profile game against India.Shoaib Malik played 287 ODIs for Pakistan and scored 7534 runs at an average of 34.55. Malik did not have a World Cup outing this time, scoring only 8 runs with two ducks in three matches. He did take 1 wicket against England.Also Read | World cup 2019: Match vs West Indies cost us the whole tournament, says Sarfaraz Ahmed after Pakistan exitAlso See:advertisementFor sports news, updates, live scores and cricket fixtures, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for Sports news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted bySaurabh Kumar Tags :Follow World Cup 2019Follow Shoaib Malik Retirementlast_img read more

Former DIG Vass Gunawardena sentenced to five years RI

His body was found in Dompe after he was reported missing. (Colombo Gazette) Vaas Gunawardena was arrested in June 2013 over the murder of the businessman.Mohammed Shyam, 35, a businessman involved in the footwear industry residing at Sagara Road in Bambalapitiya was killed on 22 May 2013. Former DIG Vass Gunawardena was sentenced to five years Rigorous Imprisonment (RI) by the Colombo High Court today after being found guilty of threatening former Assistant Superintendent of Police Shani Abeysekara.Abeysekara had been threatened during ongoing investigations into the murder of Businessman Mohammed Shiyam in 2013.

Photos Albion sugar workers protesting working conditions

Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedRose Hall Estate workers attached to Albion on strikeApril 4, 2019In “Business”Albion Estate cane harvesters picket GuySuCo’s ‘gang merger’ impositionAugust 4, 2017In “Business”$30B loan: GuySuCo lays out direction without concrete plan, GAWU pleasedApril 20, 2018In “Business” Albion Sugar workers are on their seventh day of protest over what they describe as deplorable working conditions.The protestors says they are being asked to cut and load cane in snake infested fields, while management also refuses to supply bell cane loaders to take the cane to the punts for offloading.

Ross hopes for cheaper nonalcoholic booze nixed after Donohoe says no plans

first_img Image: Shutterstock/wavebreakmedia THE GOVERNMENT HAS no plans to introduce a lower VAT rate that would reduce the cost of non-alcoholic beer, despite Shane Ross’ desire to slash prices as part of his road safety campaign.Minister for Finance Paschal Donohoe has said he doesn’t intend to reduce the cost of non-alcoholic beer through taxation, and that any attempts to do so would be “difficult” to implement and provide “considerable scope” for tax avoidance.Transport Minister Shane Ross had told the Sunday Independent that he would try to put the pressure on Donohoe to examine ways of lowering the cost of alcohol-free beer. “On the surface it beggars belief that non-alcoholic drink is more expensive than equivalent alcoholic products,” he told the paper. “We should be incentivising customers who want to enjoy a few alcohol-free beers.”There have been a growing number of alcohol-free beer options on the market in recent years, with major players in the market like Heineken and Guinness offering non-alcoholic options, and retailers reporting growth in sales.Its cost varies by pub, but it’s not uncommon for non-alcoholic drinks to be similarly priced to the other beers and ciders on tap.Non-alcoholic beer is not subject to excise duty which, on a regular pint of beer, is around 54 cent.It is, however, subject to VAT of 23%.On 5 February, Paschal Donohoe responded to a parliamentary question from Fianna Fáil TD Michael McGrath saying that were “no means under EU VAT law to apply a lower VAT rate to the supply of non-alcoholic beer”.However, just a few weeks later, the minister for finance has said this information was incorrect.“The position is that it is may be possible under Annex III of the VAT Directive for a reduced rate to be applied to non-alcoholic beverages,” he said.Despite it being possible, Donohoe poured cold water on the idea it could be happening any time soon, and saying any such system specifically targeting beer would be difficult to implement.“I have no plans to reduce the VAT rate on non-alcoholic beverages,” he said. “The majority of drinks, including soft drinks and bottled water, are charged to VAT at the 23% standard VAT rate in Ireland. 46 Comments Mar 2nd 2019, 7:01 AM Share3 Tweet Email1 https://jrnl.ie/4514443 Image: Shutterstock/wavebreakmedia Short URLcenter_img Ross’ hopes for cheaper non-alcoholic booze nixed after Donohoe says ‘no plans’ to reduce tax The minister for finance said reducing VAT on non-alcoholic beverages would be “difficult to administer”. Saturday 2 Mar 2019, 7:00 AM Applying a reduced VAT rate to non-alcoholic beer and wine would necessarily involve the application of different VAT rates to supplies of non-alcoholic beverages. This would be difficult to administer and would be likely to provide considerable scope for manipulation of the VAT system and potential opportunities for tax avoidance. By Sean Murray 15,549 Views Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this articlelast_img read more

Trio steals 150K in jewelry from Miami Beach home

first_imgMIAMI BEACH, FLA. (WSVN) – Police are on the lookout for a trio of people who robbed a Miami Beach home.Police said on Jan. 20, three people approached a home located along South Hibiscus Drive and East Second Court and broke inside.Police said they managed to get away with nearly $150,000 worth of jewelry.Luckily, the ordeal was captured on camera.If you have any information on this burglary, call Miami-Dade Crime Stoppers at 305-471-TIPS. Remember, you can always remain anonymous, and you may be eligible for a $1,000 reward.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img

Dee Daniels Vocal Jazz Workshop Gets Underway

first_imgDownload AudioThe Dee Daniels Vocal Jazz Workshop is underway this week in Sitka.  For the last two years, Daniels has interrupted her touring and teaching schedule to live at the Sitka Fine Arts Camp, and coach a half-dozen students of widely-ranging ages and ability.last_img

Bringing Indias rich cultural heritage into spotlight

first_imgClassics, an organization promoting Indian classical music and dance is hosting a two-day music and dance festival in New Delhi. The festival will be held on September 14-15, at the Muktadhara Auditorium, 6.00 p m onwards.The first day of the festival will witness a solo Kathak recital by Tanushri Roy, Artistic Director of the Shrinkhala Dance Ensemble and a vocal recital by Pandit Naresh Kumar Malhotra. The second day will witness a group tabla performance followed by vocal recitals by Gopa Bhattacharya and Saswati Bagchi and a sitar recital by Debajyoti Mukherjee. The first day of the festival will also honour the presence of Pt. Rajendra Prasanna, Sangeet Natak Akademi awardee.This is an endeavor to promote young, upcoming artists alongside senior exponents in order to nourish India’s rich cultural heritage. Entry is free and open to all.last_img read more

WATCH Let Ezekiel Elliotts Salvation Army touchdown celebration get you in the

first_img Advertisement The NFL just can’t handle a good time. They can’t even loosen up for the holiday party. It was made officially official last night on Sunday Night Football in Dallas, when Ezekiel Elliott punched in a goal line touchdown to break a 3-3 second quarter tie against the Bucs.After busting through the line for the score, Elliott ran towards the crowd and spotted a giant prop version of the Salvation Army donation bucket. In a brilliant moment of improv, he jumped into the bucket. As soon as he did, the refs donated some penalty flags for excessive celebration to the cause. Please, Mr. Scrooge. It’s Christmas.Ezekiel Elliott runs into Cowboys RB Rookie History. As well as jumping into the Salvation Army Kettle Pot. #TBvsDAL #CowboysNation pic.twitter.com/nqJMlTnrgW— Dylan (@DylansFreshTake) December 19, 2016 Elliott ran for 159 yards in the 26-20 Dallas win, and this morning, Ian Rapoport is reporting that the NFL will not fine Elliott for the stunt.It would even be tone deaf by Roger Goodell’s standards to fine a player for drawing attention to a charity that helps families in need during the holidays.Source: #Cowboys RB Ezekiel Elliott will not be fined for jumping into the kettle following his TD run. That’s good to hear.— Ian Rapoport (@RapSheet) December 19, 2016center_img Well, as they say – Roger Goodell’s small heart grew three sizes this day.If you would like to donate to the Salvation Army, click here.last_img read more

Avail A 50 Discount On The Sid Meiers Civilization VI – The

first_img Share Tweet Submit This game is the one for you and it definitely doesn’t need any introduction. You can get the entire Sid Meier’s bundle if you want. But if you aren’t interested in the bundle, even then we have an amazing offer for you. Wccftech is offering an amazing discount on the Sid Meier’s Civilization VI. This is the newest entry to the saga and will keep you engaged in more ways than one. So are you game? Or shall I convince you some more?Sid Meier’s Civilization VI featuresThis franchise has sold over 35 million units since its creation and is currently host to a community of players who are trying to build an empire for themselves. You can also become part of this community. Advance your civilization from the Stone Age to the Information Age by advancing your culture, waging wars, conducting diplomacy and basically do everything that was required from the leaders of that generation. There are only 5 ways to be victorious, but which way will you choose? Here are highlights of what the deal has to offer: Redeem on Steam and start playing instantly See the marvels of your empire spread across the map like never before Unlock boosts that speed your civilization’s progress through history by actively exploring & developing your environment Interact with other civilizations dynamically based on where they are in their development Combine units to build more powerful defenses Cooperate & compete with your friends in a wide variety of situations all designed to be completed in a single sessionCompatibility Mac OS X 10.11.6 (El Capitan) and 10.12 (Sierra)Processor: Intel Core i5 (4 cores) Processor speed: 2.7 GHz 6GB RAM 15GB hard disk space Video card: ATI Radeon HD 6970, NVIDIA GeForce GT 775M, Intel Iris Pro1GB VRAMThe deal will be expiring in a few days so you better hurry up and invest soon. Are you ready?Original Price Sid Meier’s Civilization VI: $59.99Wccftech Discount Sid Meier’s Civilization VI: $29.99last_img read more

VIDEO Demonstration of Shimadzus Trinias Interventional Xray System

first_img Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 3:27Loaded: 0.00%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -3:27 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Find more SCCT news and videos Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Technology Reports View all 9 items Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Information Technology View all 220 items Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Find more SCCT news and videos CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floorcenter_img Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Find more SCCT news and videos Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Conference Coverage View all 396 items Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Sponsored Content | Videos | Angiography | February 03, 2017 VIDEO: Demonstration of Shimadzu’s Trinias Interventional X-ray System Tom Kloetzly, sales and marketing VP for Shimadzu Medical Systems USA, explains the evolution of Shimadzu Corporation since its founding 142 years ago. Kloetzly focuses on the Trinias Interventional X-ray lineshown at RSNA. Kloetzly states “A key feature of Trinias, is the ability to image from fingertip to fingertip during a transradial approach which makes for much shorter hospital stay with the patient up and moving almost immediately after the procedure. Features Like RSM-DSA, a type of motion correction subtraction, eliminates patient movement during acquisition while STENTVIEW, is an enhanced visualization during stent placement in real-time.” For more information, visit www.shimadzu.com/med/products/angio/index.html Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Recent Videos View all 606 items Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more SCCT news and videos Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Find more news and videos from AAPM. Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Women’s Health View all 62 items Radiation Oncology View all 91 items RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Find more SCCT news and videos Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicinelast_img read more

Olympic traffic management London 2012

first_imgVenues parking plans and traffic management schemes have been proposed for the 2012 Olympic Games in London. The London 2012 Organising Committee (LOCOG) announced plans to implement traffic regulations, making venue access safer and less disruptive to local residents and businesses. “We have to ensure that spectators can get from transport links to venues safely, whilst providing a reliable and secure transport service to get athletes, officials and media into venues,” LOCOG CEO, Paul Deighton said. The alteration to traffic conditions and parking restrictions aims to improve productivity throughout the city during the Games. “We want local businesses to thrive this summer and are determined that London will be open for business during the Games,” Mr Deighton added. The Olympic Route Network (ORN) is in its final stages under the direction of Transport for London (TfL), ensuring a less stressful commute between venues for attendees. “We’re working closely with LOCOG and other key partners to finalise traffic and parking plans and communicate these to all Londoners in the areas affected,” MD for TfL, Leon Daniels said. Source = e-Travel Blackboard: P.Tlast_img read more

Angry response to blockade of crossing points

first_imgPolitical parties on Monday called for universal respect for the law after a group briefly blocked the Dheryneia crossing on Sunday calling for the closing of all crossing points.The call from Akel and Disy came after some 50 people, members of a group calling themselves the ‘Non-party Initiative for the Closure of Checkpoints’ blocked the Dheryneia crossing on Sunday for around 10 minutes.The group said that they would block different crossing points each Sunday until January 20. The next one is Strovilia, followed by Pergamos, Ledra street, Ledra Palace, Ayios Dometios, Astromeritis, Kato Pyrgos and Dheryneia again.Sunday’s protest and the group’s intention of blocking a crossing each week has caused widespread anger and a call for action by authorities.Ruling Disy on Monday said that they condemn every form of protest that restricts the rights of others.The party said that even though it recognises the right to protest, “we cannot in any way accept the closure of crossings and the name-calling of our fellow citizens travelling to the occupied areas through the crossings.” It also called for respect of the law.Main opposition Akel called on the police and the state to intervene. The protests, it said, against a government policy following the agreement between the two community leaders are “unacceptable and condemnable”.It also called on the police to explain what measures were taken on Sunday during the road blockade and what they intend to do as regards the intention of the group to block other crossings.A police source told the Cyprus Mail that the public are not allowed to block roads. In this case, the protest took place for a short period of time and did not disrupt vehicles crossing. But if the group tried to block a crossing where there was traffic, they would not be allowed to do it, the source said. You May LikePopularEverythingColorado Mom Adopted Two Children, Months Later She Learned Who They Really ArePopularEverythingUndoPlarium I Vikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 minute and see why everyone is addictedPlarium I Vikings: Free Online GameUndoSecurity SaversWindows Users Advised To Do This TodaySecurity SaversUndo Turkish Cypriot actions in Varosha ‘a clear violation’ of UN resolutions, Nicosia saysUndoThe Deniz boat incident showed clearly the intentions of the Turkish sideUndoConcern over falling tourism numbersUndoby Taboolaby Taboolalast_img read more

Bill sees reduction of electromagnetic emissions

first_imgThe House Labour Committee discussed a draft bill on Tuesday put forward by Green Party head Giorgos Perdikis to limit the public’s exposure to electromagnetic frequencies.After the meeting, committee chairman Andreas Fakontis said there are 1,300 radio and mobile phone towers and TV masts around Cyprus and that only half of those are licenced.Fakontis said that there is concern among the public over the health effects of being exposed to these frequencies.“For us, and the committee, the public’s health is above all else, especially the health of children, who are vulnerable,” he said.He added that the current law has been in place since 2006 and that it needs to be updated, and that measures need to be put in place to protect the public.The committee requested that the health ministry and the State Electric Service to look into the matter, and how exposure to electromagnetic frequencies is dealt with in other European countries.According to Fakontis, the State Electric Service said that if the frequencies are reduced than there would have to be an increase in the number of towers.Discussion on the matter will continue.You May LikePopularEverythingColorado Mom Adopted Two Children, Months Later She Learned Who They Really ArePopularEverythingUndoLivestlyChip And Joanna’s $18M Mansion Is Perfect, But It’s The Backyard Everyone Is Talking AboutLivestlyUndoYahoo SearchYou’ve Never Seen Luxury Like This On A Cruise Ship. Search Luxury Mediterranean CruisesYahoo SearchUndo Pensioner dies after crash on Paphos-Polis roadUndoCruise passenger airlifted to Paphos hospitalUndoRemand for pair in alleged property fraud (Updated)Undoby Taboolaby Taboolalast_img read more