‘Jaswant Singh’s budget prove that middle class is the lifeline of India’s economy’

‘Jaswant Singh’s budget prove that middle class is the lifeline of India’s economy’

first_imgBalanced Trial Jaswant Singh’s budget is like an attractive icing on the hard cake that is our nation’s dismal economy (“Middle-class Muscle”, March 10). The budget prompts the middle class to earn more, buy more, borrow more, spend more and eventually pay more (taxes). Only goes to prove that the,Balanced TrialJaswant Singh’s budget is like an attractive icing on the hard cake that is our nation’s dismal economy (“Middle-class Muscle”, March 10). The budget prompts the middle class to earn more, buy more, borrow more, spend more and eventually pay more (taxes). Only goes to prove that the middle class is the lifeline of India’s economy. K. CHIDANAND KUMAR, BangaloreThis year’s budget will go down in history as a dream budget for middleclass Indians who aspire to become the upper class. The reduction in the interest of small savings instruments should drive home the point to millions of people that the days of safe and high returns guaranteed by the government are over. Let us realise that when we manage and work for our personal health and career, we must also manage our finances for future savings and retirement benefits instead of depending on government-backed savings instruments. KANAK R. NAMBIAR, KaraikalJaswant deserves to be complimented for fulfilling his task in a difficult political environment. Nevertheless, the cumulative effect is bound to be inflationary. This reminds me of the words of John F. Kennedy: “Inflation is like getting stuck in a traffic jam; you find you are part of the problem but you cannot work out what to do about it.” The consolation perhaps lies in British economist O.W. Holmes’ observation: “Inflation and taxes are the prices we pay for being in a civilised society.” K. GOPAKUMAR MENON, TrichurBack in the Pavilion”Jaswant Singh wanted to pull the budget straight to the extra-cover fence, got the inner edge and was caught behind by his own NDA allies.” RAAJ GOPAL MEHROTRA, KanpurCaste, the CredoI am shocked at the furore over the unveiling of V.D. Savarkar’s portrait in Parliament (“Picture Imperfect”, March 10). If Savarkar was indeed a traitor, as some would like to believe, why would he put so much at stake, make several sacrifices and launch a revolutionary movement? Isn’t it ironic that a man who ended the dominance of a few and opened numerous temples to Dalits in Maharashtra, is construed to have been casteist just because he was a Brahmin? The fact of the matter is that we are ungrateful wretches and simply don’t deserve the freedom we have got courtesy the blood, sweat and tears of heroes like Savarkar. VIRAJ V. KULKARNI, MumbaiIn our freedom struggle there was a unique “Mahatma”, a unique “Netaji” and a unique “Veer”. A true Indian cherishes the memories of all these three great patriots. Savarkar’s portrait may or may not adorn the walls of Parliament but he lives in the hearts of millions of Indians and Maharashtrians. GP-CAPTAIN (RETD) S.R. PURANDARE, on e-mailAwkward PositionThe preposterous presumption of self-appointed experts that sex education is the panacea for all related ills in society has always appalled me (“Oral Lessons”, March 10). A teenager’s emotional turmoil is not so simple as to be interpreted in terms of being merely repressed sexual urges. I do not think it is wise to promote and encourage free sex through insinuating and titillating advertisements. If someone seeks specific information, then certainly it should be readily and correctly made available to them but not as a matter of encouraging experimentation. I am no prude, but please let us not make the mistake of stretching the rubber jollies too far and too thin. VIVEK KHANNA, PanchkulaCost EffectiveUnlike the junkets of chief ministers of other states, the foreign travels of N. Chandrababu Naidu have brought about tangible results to Andhra Pradesh (“Flight of Fancy”, March 10). He has not shied away from taking tough measures to bring financial respectability to the state. He doesn’t pamper an average Andhraite by doling out unreasonable sops and his election campaigns are far from rabble-rousing rhetoric. He is one of the rare chief ministers who has taken personal interest in providing a transparent and accessible government. To add visibility to Brand Andhra, his jaunts to overseas destinations are steps in the right direction. Perhaps an investigation into the journeys of other chief ministers would show that Naidu has attracted one of the highest foreign investments per rupee spent on foreign travels. AADITYA VIDYARTHI, on e-mail”Pt Ravi Shankar’s assertion that music is in Norah’s genes is as absurd as drawing a circle around a gunshot mark and claiming to be an ace shooter.” RAJNEESH BATRA, DelhiCheer UmpireThe former-cricketers-turned TV commentators are either suffering from amnesia or have forgotten how they used to play (“The Other Battle”, March 10). The harsh comments they now make are mainly due to jealousy- during their times there was no scope for the money earned by current players. M.S. RAO, BelgaumThe Indian team’s anger at the venom being vented against it is fully justified. Agreed, the team was not doing well when it left for the World Cup but the last thing it needed was the abominable public behaviour. Adding fuel to fire were the unwarranted, uncharitable remarks made by people from the same fraternity. We need to respect those who are doing such a difficult job. They represent our country and the least we can do is give the Indian team moral support. JONAKI BHATTACHARYA, PuneProvocative statements should be taken in one’s stride. Polished euphemisms for bad play and superlative encomiums for occasional good performance are no longer preferred in these days of competitive sports. P.S. DESIKAN, on e-mailFair-weather FansThe ridiculous reaction of the so-called fans of the Indian cricket team after it lost to Australia was evidence of the fact that they only want to be a part of the team’s wins and not of its losses at all (“Back from the Brink”, March 3). This only shows their selfish attitude. As far as Sourav Ganguly’s captaincy is concerned, each of his critics should take turns captaining the side and see what it is like to lead a team that has the expectations of one billion people on its shoulders and is trying its best to fulfil them but still gets sneered at and criticised. ABHILASHA RAO, Sambalpur, OrissaFalse DopeI don’t much care for the Australian cricketers- they have an ego the size of an ostrich egg-but the way you mauled the reputation of Shane Warne was appalling (“Cricket in Chaos”, February 24). What would your reaction be if Sachin Tendulkar took a flu tablet and found himself in the same situation Warne was in? When the Mike Denness affair erupted Indians said that he had been too hard on Tendulkar and the others, and they had been discriminated against. What about this discrimination against another matchwinner and icon? Warne is no druggie. He is too great a cricketer to need tablets and pills to help him. RICHARD THOMPSON, on e-mailThug of WarThe way George W. Bush is frantically trying to convince the world that Saddam Hussein is the bad guy reminds me of a folktale in Kannada (“The War is On”, March 3). A tiger who wanted to devour a lamb started threatening him for muddying the water of his stream. When the petrified lamb tried to reason that he was nowhere near the stream, the tiger came up with all sorts of ridiculous excuses: that it must have been his mother or his father or his grandparents. Finally, the tiger blurted out before pouncing on the lamb, “Who cares? I am going to kill you now!” The attitude of the US is similar. RAGHUNANDAN GOLLAHALLI, on e-mailOne of Their KindThe death of the seven astronauts on board Columbia deserves our sympathy and grief (“Eternal Voyager”, February 17). But the praise heaped on Kalpana Chawla reflects an exaggerated sense of Indianness. Chawla was no longer an Indian and had in no way contributed to our country. So many Indians die each day trying to save their motherland. When are we going to appreciate these real heroes and their sacrifices? Chawla did not represent our country unlike the Israeli astronaut in the ill-fated space shuttle. Even at the time of her death she was carrying the US flag on her space-suit. DR C. XAVIER JAYASEELAN, NagercoilObject to Affection”Why get hyper about public display of love when it is part of social change?” MAYA BHATKAR Mumbai”Openness may be okay but not at the cost of our culture. It has an ugly impact on young minds.” MOHAMMED TAUSEEF, PatnaDrawing the Party LineI was highly amused to read Shobhaa De’s column, coming as it did from as avid a partywallah as I am (“Join the Party”, January 27). I like to celebrate life, I do so without any compunction and certainly without any hypocrisy. The Des are on my social list because they have very graciously in the past invited me to a number of their social dos. Because I believe in reciprocating, I, in turn, invite them to mine. However, after reading the article, I have realised that Shobhaa De treats invitations from “partywallahs in Parliament” with a great deal of contempt and, therefore, to spare her further agony, I shall not invite her to any of my parties, including my birthday, my friends’ birthdays or my children’s birthdays. Hopefully, that may spare her some of the effort that so exhausts her when she is required to “network” or, in her own words, to indulge in “contact making”. AMAR SINGH, Member of the Rajya Sabha, Delhiadvertisementadvertisementadvertisementlast_img

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